Sudan: police disperse a new anti-government demonstration

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The anti-riot police have dispersed them Tuesday to shots of tear gas, a new anti-government protest in Khartoum, nearly four weeks after the beginning of a protest movement in Sudan was triggered by the increases in the price of bread, according to witnesses.

Men and women chanting, “peace, justice, freedom” or “We are fighters”, have gathered in the business district of El-Kalakla, south of the capital Khartoum, before the intervention of the police, who fired tear gas, according to the witnesses to the AFP.

Following a new call to protest on Tuesday against president Omar el-Bashir, reinforcements have been deployed to support the police in several districts of Khartoum, as well as in the twin town upon omdurman.

In the evening, the gathering was divided into small groups and protesters gathered in the streets and alleys, before being hunted by the police, according to the same sources.

A protest movement began on December 19, in Sudan after the government’s decision to triple the price of bread, in a country in full economic downturn.

The demonstrations quickly turned into a challenge to the power of Omar al-Bashir, who rules the country with an iron hand since 1989.

Twenty-four people have died since the beginning of the movement, according to an official toll. The NGO Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International speak of at least 40 dead.

Last week, the national Commission on Human Rights condemned “the use of live ammunition against the citizens” and called on the government to “investigate,” on the violence. It was the first time that a government agency acknowledged the use of live ammunition against protesters.

At the initiative of the protests, the Association of professionals of the sudan, which includes doctors, professors and engineers, has called for a “week of uprising”.

About 1,000 people-including activists, opposition leaders, and journalists, have been arrested in different towns of the Sudan in four weeks of protests, according to rights groups human rights.

Came to power by a coup d’etat, Mr. Bashir has blamed the violence of the last few weeks of “thugs” and “conspirators”, without, however, naming them.

Monday, in front of the crowd gathered in Niyala, capital of South Darfur, he ensured that the dispute would not be able to “change power”.

“There is only one path to power, and that is the ballot box. The sudanese people will decide in 2020 that must govern,” said Mr Bashir, aged 75 years, of which a third candidacy to the presidential election scheduled for next year is anticipated.

He further stated that Sudan was facing “economic problems” that can not be solved by looting and fires. Several buildings and offices of the national Congress party of Mr Bashir have been torched in the first days of the protests.

Amputated three-quarters of its oil reserves since the independence of South Sudan in 2011, the country is facing an inflation of almost 70% per year.Many cities suffer from shortages of bread and fuel.

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